Short Essay On Importance Of Indian Culture

On August 15, 1947, India woke up to freedom. Decades later we continue to celebrate this day when we became a free and sovereign nation. With great leaders like Gandhiji in the forefront, India won Independence through peaceful means. This day is a national holiday and the Prime Minister hoists the national flag at the Red Fort, followed by a speech which is broadcast nationally from its ramparts.

In space

I am proud to be Indian because of our country’s achievements in space and missile technology. India has launched a number of satellites in space for helping us in weather forecast, communications, medical research, and education. The missiles such as Agni, Prithvi strengthened our nation’s security and ensured a place in the elite group of the world’s powerful countries. Moreover, our scientists have lifted India’s pride by placing our Tri-colour on the moon and are now looking for landing in the planet Mars.

S.SRI SAGANA, LKG B, SSVM World School, Coimbatore

World citizen

I am a citizen of the world because I am an Indian! I am proud to be an Indian because I am aware that it is a great privilege and an immense responsibility too. I am proud to be an Indian because I know what I represent.

Vinayaka, X, Satyam International School, Bellary, Karnataka

Right to be

I am proud to be an Indian because I have the freedom to speak, write and protest against evil doings. We have the right to stand up and fight when we see human cruelty .

G. JOY ANTONIE PAUL, III, Good Shepherd English School, Karaikal, Puducherry

Brotherhood

India is a country where people respect elders. People of India live in peace and harmony. India is the only country where there are people of different languages, religions and race, but all of them live together in harmony..

India is an integrated country where people show brotherhood among others.

Dilna, IX, Kendriya Vidyalaya, Kannur

Super superpower

I am proud to be an Indian because India is the largest democracy in the world. It has a civilisation that is more than 5000 years old and boasts of multiple cultural origins. There is an emerging global, scientific and technological superpower, with a diverse environment in flora and fauna.

P.N.DWARKESH, VI, SRI B.S.C.J.V School, Chennai

Great variety

There is so much to being an Indian that one can never be proud enough.

The variety in languages, cultures, lifestyles, cuisines, climatic conditions, scenic beauty, architecture, traditions...It is not only our great achievers, in fields more than many, but also the common people that strive to make it better, day by day. There are already enough mentions about our great discoveries, inventions, spices, arts and craft, technological genius, media, film, advertising, medicine, finance, fashion, textiles, agriculture, self reliability and spirituality.

K.Vishnu Sai, X, Kendriya Vidyalaya No.1, Tirupati

Just love it

I am proud to be an Indian because of its rich tradition and heritage. The unity in diversity is unique to our nation. I have got tons of reasons to love my country, but the most important thing is I love my country and I need no reason for it.

Jai Hind!

Govind Pareek, X, Candlewick Public School, Jaipur

Striding forward

It is a land of holy rivers, beautiful mountains and dense forests. There is natural beauty in our country. It has a great ancient civilisation and culture. I am proud because of the giant strides we have made in industry, science and technology.

M. Harika, V, Ratnam Academy of Children Education, Nellore.

Originally yours

I am extremely proud to be an Indian because I was born here. India is a vibrant place where you will find innumerable differences co-existing. It is one of the oldest civilisations. Its myriad cultures has been an amalgamation of various civilisations without disturbing its distinct form. It gives us peace of mind that we belong to a place we can call our motherland. It will grow old but has still not lost its sheen and glitter. It has bestowed its warmth and love just like a mother does on her child.

Subasri Ashok, Grade 10, Dubai

Celebration

I am proud to be Indian as we have festivals to celebrate throughout the year and in my class there are students from all religions. All of us learn from one another.

Paridhi, III, GD Goenka Public School, Rohini, Delhi.

Beautiful nation

My country with its rich heritage and tradition I say is the most beautiful nation. We are also recognised for being the world’s second largest population. But unity in diversity is the main reason for my pride in being an Indian. We have different languages, different cultures, food, clothes, and traditions and yet we stand united. Non violence, democracy, intelligence based on our high standards of education, our natural wealth, harmony, festivals, family, system, caring for the aged, service and sacrifice are some of the things that I am proud of.

Godwin Gilbert, V, Our Lady of Miracles Bethany Matriculation School, Annai Nagar,Tamil Nadu.

Surely the best

I was seven months old when our Nation celebrated its 53rd Independence Day — the first one after my birth. My grand dad used to describe the very first Independence Day celebration when he was a boy of seven and how the Tricolour was unfurled by a British Manager on the morning of August 15, 1947, at the Selaliparai tea factory premises in Valparai – Anamalai hills. My great grand dad was the Headmaster of the local school and he sang the songs Thayin ManikodiPareer and Aaduvomey, pallu paaduvomey, Aanandasudanthiram adainthuvittomenru on that memorable occasion.

I love the culture of my great nation mostly because it is secular. It is blessed with all resources. Further the climate in our country especially in my district is considered to be the best compared to other parts of the globe.

SHAJI ROSALIN A., VIII Beulah MHSS, Valparai

So varied

India is a land of diversity — in terms of religion, geography, culture and tradition. Though much exploited by foreign invaders we still have rich natural resources. I feel inspired and motivated by our freedom fighters. It is a land where most of the festivals are celebrated in the community, irrespective of religion. Our nation has a delectable cuisine, which I love.

Sharan U Karadi, IX, Excellent High School, Bijapur

Many reasons

I am proud to be an Indian. The reasons are many but the most important one is unity in diversity. India has varied culture and tradition, mouth watering cuisine, beautiful dances, breathtaking tourist places, different languages, the list is endless... In spite of the diversities we the children stand united.

A.S. Gopica, X A, St.Joseph's Academy, Dehradun, Uttarakhand

Freedom!

As an Indian- American, I am proud of both India and America. Even though I live in America, I will celebrate August 15. I have come to visit my family who reside in India and will be in India to share the joy of Independence.

Being born into a family originally from India, I also happen to have something in common with Mahatma Gandhi. My great grandfather Mr. N. Ramaratnam, was the news editor of a famous Tamil daily newspaper and he helped inform other Indians to act and also instilled in them a patriotic spirit.

The Tricolour stands as a symbol of freedom. Jawaharlal Nehru called it “a flag not only of freedom for our self, but a symbol of freedom to all people.”

India is full of talented, smart, and innovative people, making India such a wonderful place.

Karishma Muthukumar, Grade 6, Frank C. Leal Elementary, California, U.S.

Hospitality

I love my country .Our glorious culture, the message of truth and non-violence, multi-religious people makes me proud to be an Indian. If you travel through the country you will find different people of different religions, but every heart gives the same hospitality. In my opinion it may be the result of good in my previous birth that I am an Indian now.

G .Junaid Ahmed, IX, V.B.S, Anantapur.

History and culture

We know the greatness and richness of India. It has a long history of rich culture and tradition. Unity in diversity is a beautiful idea. India is the best example for it.The country is progressing but we have more to do. Still there are many who live in poverty. There are many children lacking education.

Joel Johnson Mathew, VIII C, Cherupushpa Bethany S.S.S., Alapuzha

From zero

I am proud to be an Indian because of its unity in diversity. India gave birth to many great people like the Buddha. Sanskrit, which is the basis for most of the European languages originated in India. Zero was invented in India.

Sai Sindhura, XI, Sri Chaitanya, Vijayawada.

Different, yet strong

I am proud to be Indian. The only country which has different religions, languages, culture which together form one nation. India is also a best example of “Unity is Strength”.

S. SARA, IX B, Velammal Vidyalaya, Theni.

Saluting India

India is a country of love, care and affection. In today’s world of selfishness, we in India still respect our elders, care for our mates and traditional culture. The pledge “ All Indians are Brothers and Sisters” is believed and followed by all of us. Thus, I feel very proud to be an Indian and lucky too.

Sariya Ali, X, Our Lady Of Fatima Secondary School, Aligarh

Sadhguru explains the importance of festivals in Indian culture, and how celebration can be a passageway to the most profound aspects of life. Further down is a list of articles about various festivals, where Sadhguru explains the significance of each one of them.

In the Indian culture, there was a time when there used to be a festival every day of the year – 365 festivals in a year – because a festival is a tool to bring life to a state of exuberance and enthusiasm. That was the significance and importance of festivals. The whole culture was in a state of celebration. If today was ploughing day, it was a kind of celebration. Tomorrow was planting day, another kind of celebration. Day after tomorrow was weeding, that was a celebration. Harvesting, of course, is still a celebration. But in the last 400 or 500 years, poverty has come to our country, and we have not been able to celebrate every day. People are satisfied if they just get some simple food to eat. So all the festivals fell away and only 30 or 40 festivals remain. We are not even able to celebrate those now because we have to go to the office or do something else daily. So people usually celebrate only around 8 or 10 festivals annually.

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Make life a celebration

Nowadays, unfortunately, a festival means they give you a holiday, and you wake up only at twelve noon. Then you eat a lot and go for a movie or watch television at home. It wasn’t like that earlier. A festival meant the whole town would gather in a place and there would be a big celebration. A festival meant we got up at four in the morning, and very actively, lots of things happened all over the house.

To bring back this culture in people, Isha celebrates four important festivals: Pongal or Makarasankranti, Mahashivratri, Dussehra and Diwali. If we don’t create something like this, by the time the next generation comes, they will not know what a festival is. They will just eat, sleep and grow up without concern for another human being. All these aspects were brought into Indian culture just to keep a man active and enthusiastic in so many ways. The idea behind this was to make our whole life into a celebration.

The Importance of festivals

If you approach everything in a celebratory way, you learn to be non-serious about life but absolutely involved. The problem with most human beings right now is, if they think something is important, they will become dead serious about it. If they think it is not so important, they will become lax about it – they don’t show the necessary involvement. You know, in India when someone says, “He is in a very serious condition,” that means his next step is you know where. A lot of people are in a serious condition. There is only one thing that is going to happen to them which is of any significance. The rest will bypass them because with anything that they think is not serious, they are unable to show involvement and dedication towards that. That is the whole problem. The passage, the secret of life is to see everything with a non-serious eye, but be absolutely involved – like a game. That is the reason the most profound aspects of life are approached in a celebratory way, so that you don’t miss the point.

Sadhguru looks at the significance and science behind the celebration of each individual festival.

Why Mahashivratri?
Mahashivratri, is perhaps the most important of festivals in India, and offers a powerful possibility for spiritual growth.

Guru Purnima
Guru Purnima, which falls on the first full moon day after Dakshinayana or the Summer Solstice, honors the Adi Guru or first Guru, Shiva, and marks the day when he began the transmission of yoga to the Saptarishis, his first seven disciples.

The Significance of Makar Sankranti
Makar Sankranti festival, traditionally seen as a harvest festival is a day when there is a significant movement in the zodiac ­– the arrangement of the earth’s dial around the sun.

Sadhguru’s Ugadi Message
Ugadi marks the Telugu new year, and also shares its date with new year celebrations in several other parts of the country. Sadhguru looks at the nature of the Indian calendar and explains why this period of the year was chosen as the new year.

The Significance of Mahalaya Amavasya or Pitru Paksha
Mahalaya Amavasya or Pitru Paksha is an important occasion when one traditionally honors his or her ancestors. Sadhguru explains the science behind these rituals.

Dussehra – Why Do We Celebrate It?
Dussehra or Vijayadashami is one of the most important Indian festivals. Sadhguru explains how each of the days in this 10-day period are significant, and how they can bring success and victory into our life.

Ayudha Pooja – What Is Its Significance?
Ayudha Pooja, the tradition of worshiping our tools and implements, is a powerful opportunity to bring devotion and reverence into our lives.

Diwali – Life as a Celebration
Diwali, the festival of lights, is a time when we can dispel darkness and bring in the light of clarity.

Editor’s Note: If you enjoyed reading about the importance of festivals, take a look at our Indian Culture series.

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