Spirituality Definition Essays On Friendship

God doesn’t promise that He’ll only ask you for the sacrifices you agree with and understand. – Eve Tushnet

The nuns taught us there are two ways through life: the way of nature and the way of grace. You have to choose which one you’ll follow. Grace doesn’t try to please itself; accepts being slighted, forgotten, disliked; accepts insults and injuries. Nature only wants to please itself. – Terence Malick, Tree of Life

In paragraph 265 of Amoris Laetitia, Pope Francis teaches:

We have to arrive at the point where the good that the intellect grasps can take root in us as a profound affective inclination, as a thirst for the good that outweighs other attractions and helps us to realize that what we consider objectively good is also good “for us” here and now. A good ethical education includes showing a person that it is in his own interest to do what is right. Today, it is less and less effective to demand something that calls for effort and sacrifice, without clearly pointing to the benefits which it can bring.

The basic message is traditional. Morality involves rational pursuit of the good. This is so by definition because humanity was created with a desire for happiness (which, as St Augustine beautifully explains in his Confessions, can ultimately be satisfied only by God) – or, as ancient Greeks called it, eudaimonia (“flourishing”). Whatever we choose, we choose because we judge, rightly or wrongly, that it will contribute to eudaimonia. As Herbert McCabe puts it:

Living well means doing good because you want to do it, because you have become the kind of you that just naturally wants to do this.

The Church believes her rules surrounding sexual behaviour are not arbitrary. The goods indicated as desirable by Church teaching are (in the Holy Father’s words) good “for us,” given the way our nature was created. Pope Francis is restating the Church’s belief that her teachings on sex concern natural law, not eccelesiastical policy.

But paradigms of moral behaviour in Scripture often cannot be understood within the context of an ethic solely focused on the pursuit of eudaimonia. In the Garden of Gethsemane, Christ prays:

Abba, Father … all things are possible for you. Take this cup from me. Yet not what I will, but what you will. (Mark 14:36)

Christ, God and man, had two wills and two intellects (human and divine). His prayer indicates the desire of his (human) will is at odds with the Father’s desire. This suggests that Christ’s human intellect, in itself, could not grasp that his Passion was “in his own interest.” If it had grasped this, even his human will would have desired to undergo the Passion, since the will naturally desires what the intellect grasps as good.

St Augustine says that by praying as he did, Christ “shows Himself to have willed something else than did His Father.” St Thomas Aquinas explains this by arguing that although Christ’s “will as reason” always “willed the same as God,” in his “rational will considered as nature, Christ could will what God did not.” What is important to note is that even the human will of Jesus, although it never experienced disordered affection, cannot be said to have had a “profound affective inclination” toward his proper good at all times; nor can his human intellect, in itself, have been capable of completely comprehending that good, even though Christ’s human intellect (unlike ours) knew everything possible for a human intellect to know.

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Nov·07

Essay on Definitions of Health

1228 Words5 Pages

Definitions of health
It is fairly difficult to define health as there are no agreements between scholars. This is why many sociologists focus their research on the different issues and problems of ill health.
Positive definition of health: positive health looks at the physical, emotional, intellectual aspects of a person’s wellbeing. This is in the way that they do not have any diseases or ailments.
An example of the positive definition of health in a health and social care is a nurse in who is working in a hospital can say to one of their patients that have recently started exercising to become more ‘healthier’ ‘you look very healthy’.
Positive health looks at what aspects of health are there and which ones make us healthy.…show more content…

An example of holistic health could be that a psychologist’s client may have bipolar disorder and the psychologist would still focus on all of the other aspects of their client’s life and not just on the symptoms the client is experiencing of bipolar disorder.
Holistic health looks as everything as a whole and never different aspects of health individually.
World Health Organisation definition of health: the World Health Organisation defines health as “not merely an absence of disease, but a state of complete physical, mental, spiritual and social well-being.” (2013 K Pritchett Class Notes)
An example of health defined by the World Health Organisation in a health and social care setting could be that in order for a patient of a doctors surgery to be healthy they would have to have a complete state of physical, mental, spiritual and social well-being. This means that if a patient was in a wheel chair they could never be seen as healthy as they do not have a complete state of physical well-being.
The World Health Organisation thinks that people must have all complete aspects to be completely healthy.
The Clinical Iceberg

‘The Clinical Iceberg’ is a term used to call the levels of illnesses that are found from official statistics. This is because some people do not always seek medical attention when they become ill therefore these official statistics may not be correct and showing the ‘true’ levels of

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